<img height="1" width="1" style="display:none" src="https://www.facebook.com/tr?id=1733746170190995&amp;ev=PageView&amp;noscript=1">

Life and Work Blog

How the 34 Strengths Deal with Change

Nov 12, 2019 9:02:07 AM / by Chris Heinz

Lately I've been getting requests for strengths programs on the topic of change. The conversation goes like this, "We've had so many changes lately, and more are coming—how do we deal with change according to our strengths?" And I say, "That's a great question, let's talk about it!" 

Each of the 34 strengths deals with change in a different way. Some rush in, some hold back, some bring others along. The key to great change management is utilizing the strengths in a positive way. By "34 strengths," we're referring to the 34 CliftonStrengths® of talent. Being aware of your talents, growing them into strengths, and aiming them toward your goals is a key to success in life and work.

We've already considered how the strengths may celebrate their birthdaydo Disney World®, choose a baby name, and dress for Halloween. In this post, we share how they deal with change. As they say, change is inevitable, but what's not inevitable is managing change using your strengths. That takes intention.

Here's how the 34 strengths deal with change:

standup paddle boarding


Achiever®: Don't want to be slowed down; show how the change will make them more productive

Activator®: Are able to act on change quickly; they will be eager to move so give timeline

Adaptability®: Are flexible and adaptable, they can create confidence that the change will be okay

Analytical®: Need to understand the causes and reasons for the change, give them time to consider the factors

Arranger®: Can handle change well, they need to understand the impact on all the moving parts they are juggling

Belief®: Can be stubborn if change interferes with personal or organizational values, show how change aligns with values

Command®: Prefer direct communication and room to speak up, don't like change being done to them if not bought in

Communication®: May be critical if change isn't communicated clearly, can be a powerful partner in shaping messaging to others

Competition®: Focused on exceeding past performance, show how the change will help to achieve goals

Connectedness®: Sees all things as connected, can help others see that change is a natural part of the story

Consistency®: May be resistant to the change's effects on current procedures, involve them in adjusting policies to the new situation

Context®: Likely to remember past changes and how they were handled, ask for insight into making it smooth

Deliberative®: May be very averse to change, give reasons and time to process the change

Developer®: Drawn to the potential in others and changes that help foster growth, will support efforts toward development

Discipline®: Used to order, structure, and routine, change may feel painful; help them to develop a new routine

Empathy®: Attune to the feelings and perspectives of others, consult them to understand how the change will affect the people

Focus®: May see change as a distraction from current work or goals, message the change as an advantage not an obstacle

Follow us on Instagram @EnneagramAndStrengths

Futuristic®: Is open to the possibilities of change, help them see the future vision of where the change will lead

Harmony®: Uneasy with change if it disrupts peace, can mediate between different parties

Ideation®: Open to change and new possibilities, good at brainstorming ideas related to the change

Includer®: Watching for who is left out of the message or who doesn't buy in, will want to know the benefits are for everyone

Individualization®: Will think about the change's effects on each individual, attune to who can play roles in the change process

Input®: Can gather information about the change process, will be valuable in sharing knowledge with others

Intellection®: Enjoy intellectual debate and conversation, give space to discuss the change and answer questions

Learner®: Open to change that brings a new frontier, have a special capacity for adopting new information

Maximizer®: Welcome change that improves quality and efficiency, can influence others to embrace change that delivers the best

Positivity®: Optimistic and hopeful about change, helps others see the upsides

Relator®: Enjoy working toward common goals, share the importance of unity and connection through the change process

Responsibility®: Are thorough and complete in their approach, they can help deliver a comprehensive change process

Restorative™: Open to change that fixes problems, communicate to them what is broken and how change will fix it

Self-Assurance®: Are naturally confident and secure, can help others feel the same in the midst of uncertainty

Significance®: Focused on making maximum impact, show how the change will enable greater impact

Strategic®: Spot options and selects the best path forward, probably knew a change was coming before it was announced

Woo®: Fairly comfortable with change, can socialize a positive concept of change among the people

Did we get this right? What are we missing?

Follow us on Instagram @EnneagramAndStrengths

 

 

Copyright © 2019 Gallup, Inc. All right reserved. Gallup®, CliftonStrengths®, and each of the 34 CliftonStrengths theme names are trademarks of Gallup, Inc.

 

Topics: Strengths

Chris Heinz

Written by Chris Heinz

I help people know themselves so they can be better. I'm a trainer and coach around strengths, the Enneagram, and employee engagement. As the Chief People Officer for EnergyCAP, Inc., I'm also a top-rated Learning Partner for Penn State. I hold coaching certifications from Gallup and the International Coach Federation, and in the Enneagram. My writing has been featured as "Best of the Week" by "Human Resources Today." I'm also the author of the “Made To Pray” book and prayer assessment, which helps people find their prayer strengths. I live with my wife and three children in central PA and blog from www.ChrisHeinz.com.